With a little help, Houston plants can adapt to Indiana home

Q: I am moving to Indiana in late spring, and I’d like your advice on taking some of my Houston plants.
I want to move some scadoxus from the ground to pots. When should I do this? I also have potted lycoris. What will their blooming behavior be in zone 5?
I’d like to pot up a small Rangoon creeper. How should I overwinter it, and how large must a potted creeper be in order to bloom?
Dave Sherron, Houston
A: Divide and transplant/pot the scadoxus, or blood lily, when the foliage has yellowed and is dying down, as the South African bulb goes dormant for the winter.
Blood lily produces softball-size orange-red blooms on tall stems in spring in Houston-area gardens. The lance-shaped foliage appears after the flowers. …read more

Via: Gardening

    

How to help your yard recover

Fifty or so inches of rain in just a few days is enough to turn any lawn into a soggy mess. And if poor drainage has left puddles where there ought to be tufts of grass, you might just have a new outdoor project on your hands.
Never mind that grass isn’t meant to live under water for days on end. It’s also not meant to be a filter for all kinds of toxins – hydrocarbon contamination or even sewage – that floated in with floodwaters.
Zach Buchanan, operations manager at Buchanan’s Native Plants, said Hurricane Harvey’s heavy rains and floodwaters will stress virtually every lawn and landscape. How they react to that stress will vary.
So keep an eye on your yard, document when changes happen and how quickly they spread. …read more

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After Hurricane Harvey cleanup, it’s time to let your garden dry out

As the floodwaters of Hurricane Harvey subside, you don’t have rush to fix things in your yard or garden.
An initial cleanup should involve removing debris and fallen branches; you don’t want detrimental fungi from rotting debris to spread to healthy plants. After that, plants just need a good rinse, said Angela Chandler, author of the Garden Academy blog and consultant to Urban Harvest.
“It sounds counter-intuitive but, really, things just need to be washed off. As quickly as you can, rinse your garden off with plain water,” she said. Any mud or dirt left behind on plants will reduce photosynthesis; they need sunlight for their own natural recovery.
The most basic problem right now is the amount of oxygen in our soil. …read more

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Garden Conservancy tour takes you into four private gardens

If you need garden or landscaping ideas, or just an afternoon passing through some pretty gardens, try the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Tour in Houston on March 25. Not only will you soak up some nature, you’ll be donating to a good cause: Peckerwood Garden. And Peckerwood’s annual sale of unusual plants will be held at the Habitat House in Spring Branch.

…read more

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